Campaigners call for Bradford Council strategy on wind turbines

Ilkley Gazette: Campaigner Anthea Orchard Campaigner Anthea Orchard

A dozen separate planning applications for wind turbines in the last four months have prompted calls for Bradford Council to publish a strategy to stop the piecemeal appearance of turbines on the district’s landscape.

Campaigners are calling for the authority to clarify its thinking on the location and number of turbines that would be acceptable across the district, to prevent wind farms being created “through the back door”.

Thornton Moor Wind Farm Action Group, which is campaigning against wind farming in Bronte Country, claims the area could be reaching “saturation point” following a flurry of applications for individual or small groups of wind turbines.

Twelve applications for wind turbines have been submitted to Bradford Council in the last four months, many at moorland farms in Keighley, Bingley, Oakworth, Thornton, Steeton and Queensbury.

Campaigner Anthea Orchard, of Denholme Gate, said: “What we want is a strategy so that it is not a free-for-all. Already there are farming areas between Denholme and Thornton where we have three turbines already and another three in the pipeline. That is six turbines on the landscape which, architects have acknowledged, could be a small wind farm. If more are allowed, it could mean a large scale wind farm being allowed through the back door.”

Councillor Val Slater, Bradford Council’s executive member for planning, said: “We consider every application we receive on its merits and it is right that we do so. We are carrying out a number of studies with reference to the Local Development Framework and environmental sustainability including our views on renewable energies and this will form part of the core strategy which is already under way and is expected to be brought to Council next year.”

Comments (6)

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8:15am Mon 8 Oct 12

angry bradfordian says...

Do the general public really think that wind turbines are an eyesore? I'm still to meet anyone who thinks that this is the case for the small individual ones that are appearing around the farms of Thornton & Denholme.
12 actually seems an insignificant number for an area that stretches from Queensbury to Steeton.

I think it's disgraceful that these campaigners are trying to stop small businesses & farmers from installing them just because they don't like them on an aesthetic basis.
Whether or not they are the answer to the upcoming energy crisis is a completely different matter.
Do the general public really think that wind turbines are an eyesore? I'm still to meet anyone who thinks that this is the case for the small individual ones that are appearing around the farms of Thornton & Denholme. 12 actually seems an insignificant number for an area that stretches from Queensbury to Steeton. I think it's disgraceful that these campaigners are trying to stop small businesses & farmers from installing them just because they don't like them on an aesthetic basis. Whether or not they are the answer to the upcoming energy crisis is a completely different matter. angry bradfordian
  • Score: 0

10:57am Mon 8 Oct 12

Albion. says...

There was a TV documentary recently which showed how someone has developed a method of storing the electricity generated by these devices, so it could be used when there is no wind.
It suggested that turbines could make a significant contribution in the future.
Personally I don't find them unsightly and would rather live near them than a nuclear or fossil fuelled power station (although technology as yet can't eliminate using power stations)(.
There was a TV documentary recently which showed how someone has developed a method of storing the electricity generated by these devices, so it could be used when there is no wind. It suggested that turbines could make a significant contribution in the future. Personally I don't find them unsightly and would rather live near them than a nuclear or fossil fuelled power station (although technology as yet can't eliminate using power stations)(. Albion.
  • Score: 0

12:16pm Mon 8 Oct 12

oldsilver says...

its time we built them on every hill,we should be thankfull of where we live,let Bradford lead the way,like we did years ago with water and sewage.we havent done much good since,
its time we built them on every hill,we should be thankfull of where we live,let Bradford lead the way,like we did years ago with water and sewage.we havent done much good since, oldsilver
  • Score: 1

12:30pm Mon 8 Oct 12

Bone_idle18 says...

Seeing as there will be a shortage of power by 2015m, which will mean importing gas from abroad at great expense, we need to do everything we can you mitigate this. Wind-farms and the rapid development of energy storage are a real and viable option.
Maybe we could have a option to opt in or out of sustainable energy on the electricity bills, people who opt out can then pay the rate for imported gas, and the rest can get good, cheap sustainable electricity, sourced locally.
Seeing as there will be a shortage of power by 2015m, which will mean importing gas from abroad at great expense, we need to do everything we can you mitigate this. Wind-farms and the rapid development of energy storage are a real and viable option. Maybe we could have a option to opt in or out of sustainable energy on the electricity bills, people who opt out can then pay the rate for imported gas, and the rest can get good, cheap sustainable electricity, sourced locally. Bone_idle18
  • Score: 0

12:31pm Mon 8 Oct 12

Bone_idle18 says...

Seeing as there will be a shortage of power by 2015m, which will mean importing gas from abroad at great expense, we need to do everything we can you mitigate this. Wind-farms and the rapid development of energy storage are a real and viable option.
Maybe we could have a option to opt in or out of sustainable energy on the electricity bills, people who opt out can then pay the rate for imported gas, and the rest can get good, cheap sustainable electricity, sourced locally.
Seeing as there will be a shortage of power by 2015m, which will mean importing gas from abroad at great expense, we need to do everything we can you mitigate this. Wind-farms and the rapid development of energy storage are a real and viable option. Maybe we could have a option to opt in or out of sustainable energy on the electricity bills, people who opt out can then pay the rate for imported gas, and the rest can get good, cheap sustainable electricity, sourced locally. Bone_idle18
  • Score: 0

2:08pm Mon 8 Oct 12

mad matt says...

I certainly don't have a problem with the small private wind turbines that farmers and country residents wish to install to supply their own homes. However the giant towering monsters that companies want to build all over the countryside are another thing entirely.
These need to be eithger put out to sea or replaced with tidal turbines which would give a much more reliable and predictable output.
I certainly don't have a problem with the small private wind turbines that farmers and country residents wish to install to supply their own homes. However the giant towering monsters that companies want to build all over the countryside are another thing entirely. These need to be eithger put out to sea or replaced with tidal turbines which would give a much more reliable and predictable output. mad matt
  • Score: 0

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