Ilkley bluebell woods’ park sign ‘is misleading’

Ilkley Gazette: The greatly eroded land at the woods, affecting bluebell growth The greatly eroded land at the woods, affecting bluebell growth

Much-loved bluebell woods should have ‘urban park’ signs removed from them to prevent visitors trampling down more of the landscape.

Ilkley resident, Frazer Irwin, captured images of bare earth, eroded and widened paths in the woods at Middleton, north of Ilkley, a popular spot for walkers at this time of year.

Areas once carpeted by picturesque swathes of bluebells in the 100-plus acre woodland have been worn down to bare soil, he says, and what appears to be steps cut into one of the best bluebell banks in the woods.

Mr Irwin said: “I have a suggestion: Bradford Council removes the 'Urban Park' signs from the entrance to both Stubham Woods. The wording for a start is wrong. It is not a park.

“They give the wrong impression to what visitors are entering.”

He asked Ilkley Parish Council, at its meeting earlier this month to make strong representations to Bradford Council, and ask where mobile rangers were when the damage was being done.

Sue Gledhill, of Bradford Council’s Keighley Area-Co-ordinator’s office, told the meeting she would investigate the concerns.

Comments (1)

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4:27pm Mon 2 Jun 14

pjl20 says...

It is about time that Bradford MDC returned some of our council tax money, that is siphoned-off from us in Ilkley in vast amounts every year to be spent in the inner city areas and on Housing benefit.

We need some properly defined pathways in our woods and some 'no-go' areas during the time of flowering bluebells in April and May.

These ancient woodlands need protecting for both ourselves, future generations and visitors who visit here for pleasure.
It is about time that Bradford MDC returned some of our council tax money, that is siphoned-off from us in Ilkley in vast amounts every year to be spent in the inner city areas and on Housing benefit. We need some properly defined pathways in our woods and some 'no-go' areas during the time of flowering bluebells in April and May. These ancient woodlands need protecting for both ourselves, future generations and visitors who visit here for pleasure. pjl20
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